The Ten Bells
The Ten Bells


The Ten Bells pub was for many years called ‘the Jack the Ripper’, thanks to its indelible link to the Ripper’s crimes. On 9 November 1888, Mary Kelly, a 25-year-old described as having ‘a fair complexion, light hair and rather attractive features’, left the pub before becoming Jack the Ripper’s final victim. Her mutilated body was discovered the next morning in Miller’s Court, Dorset Street, on the opposite side of the road from the Ten Bells.

However, that’s not the only the terrifying story in the pub’s long history. In the late 1990s, staff living in the pub complained about alarming encounters they’d been having with a ghostly old man dressed in Victorian clothing. After awaking with an uneasy feeling in the middle of the night, they would turn over to find this phantom lying beside them in the bed, but as soon as they cried out, he disappeared.

Location: 84 Commercial Street, London, E1 6LY

Photographer: Paul Jeffs

The Ten Bells


The Ten Bells pub was for many years called ‘the Jack the Ripper’, thanks to its indelible link to the Ripper’s crimes. On 9 November 1888, Mary Kelly, a 25-year-old described as having ‘a fair complexion, light hair and rather attractive features’, left the pub before becoming Jack the Ripper’s final victim. Her mutilated body was discovered the next morning in Miller’s Court, Dorset Street, on the opposite side of the road from the Ten Bells.

However, that’s not the only the terrifying story in the pub’s long history. In the late 1990s, staff living in the pub complained about alarming encounters they’d been having with a ghostly old man dressed in Victorian clothing. After awaking with an uneasy feeling in the middle of the night, they would turn over to find this phantom lying beside them in the bed, but as soon as they cried out, he disappeared.

Location: 84 Commercial Street, London, E1 6LY

Photographer: Paul Jeffs